There is no exact definition of ‘good character’ in British Nationality legislation. However, good character applies to anybody over the age of 10 who is applying for naturalisation, resumption or Registration as a British citizen.

by Emma Bashford | | Blog

There is no exact definition of ‘good character’ in British Nationality legislation. However, good character applies to anybody over the age of 10 who is applying for naturalisation, resumption or Registration as a British citizen.

When applying to naturalise as a British citizen, under the British Nationality Act 1981 (BNA), most applicants will need to satisfy a good character requirement. This is a mandatory requirement for applicants over the age of ten, although the BNA does not provide any statutory definition. Instead, the question of ‘good character’ is assessed on the basis of Home Office policy guidance.

This guidance was re-issued on 30 September 2020, primarily to reflect the post-Brexit requirement for EEA nationals to comply with UK immigration laws.  The guidance sets out the types of conduct that the Home Office must take into account when assessing good character.

Where there is evidence of any one of the long list of issues under the guidance that would indicate that a person is not of good character or evidence that otherwise casts serious doubts on the applicant’s character, then their citizenship application will normally be refused.

You can read further detail in this excellent blog

 


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